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Korean J Art Hist > Volume 303; 2019 > Article
Korean Journal of Art History 2019;303:39-71.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.31065/ahak.303.303.201909.002    Published online September 30, 2019.
Six Features of Three Kingdoms Period Architecture
Nancy S. Steinhardt
Received: 5 June 2019   • Revised: 14 June 2019   • Accepted: 10 August 2019
Abstract
This paper examines six features of architecture that are found in buildings of the fifththrough-seventh centuries in at least one of the Three Kingdoms (Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla). Particular attention is paid to features that are found in buildings of two of the Korean kingdoms as well as China. The first feature is the arrangement of brick layers in tombs. It is compared in the tomb of King Muryeong (462-523) of Baekje, a Wu Kingdom tomb, and tombs in Jiayuguan. The second feature is the relation tombs in the same Jiayuguan region of Gansu and Goguryeo. Third is the relation between monastery and tomb, in Goguryeo, Baekje, and major Chinese capitals from Han China through the sixth century. Fourth is the relation between tall buildings, particularly pagodas, in more than one monastery. It is examined in Silla, Northern Wei, and Northern Qi. Pairing of structures is fifth and sixth is octagonal construction. The conclusion emphasizes that only through transnational East Asian research can one understand the architecture of three centuries from which so few buildings remain, and that aspects of Chinese architecture that have not been explained can be more deeply understood through what survives in Korea.
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